Advocacy

This centers on the protection of children and the promotion of their rights as set out in the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC). GNIP organises child rights clubs (CRCs), strengthens the local councils for the protection of children (LCPCs), and conducts child rights campaigns.

gnip-advocacy

1. Child Rights Club (CRC)

Gigmoto CDP. Prieto CDP. Diaz CDP. Pugad-Tibaguin CDP. Sagrada Familia CDP

GNIP organizes child rights clubs (CRCs) composed of children (youth) in its community development project (CDP) areas to provide a venue for children to express their concerns, issues, and needs and to plan out activities that will promote awareness on child issues to their fellow children.

“GNIP organizes child rights clubs (CRCs)… to provide a venue for children to express their concerns, issues, and needs.”

At present, 7 out of GNIP’s CDPs have already organized CRCs, with a total of 227 members. The Southville CDP has the most number of members. The CRCs remain active through their involvement in many activities—such as leadership trainings, summer camps, children’s month celebrations, seminars, child rights campaigns, and environmental activities. (end)

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2. National Children’s Month Celebration

Prieto CDP. Diaz CDP. Tingloy CDP. Southville CDP

IMG_8000-2IMG_8177-2Presidential Proclamation No. 267 declares the month of October as the National Children’s Month, to recognize the Filipino children as the most valuable asset of the nation and to emphasize their importance in the society. This supersedes Proclamation No. 74, which sets October 17 of every year as the National Children’s Day.

In the Prieto Diaz CDPs, GNIP took part in the celebration of children’s month initiated by the Area-Based Standards Network–Sorsogon (ABSNet-Sorsogon), a network that GNIP is a member of. The monthlong celebration carried out various activities that emphasized child rights—such as a motorcade, children’s dialogue and testimonies, and GNIP-facilitated games.

“The children raised their concerns on issues about corporal punishment, child labor, malnutrition, and early pregnancy”

In the Tingloy CDP, the children’s month celebration focused on 390 preschool children, in partnership with the local government of Tingloy, the municipal social welfare and development office, the parents, and the teachers. The activities—which included poster-making, singing, and declamation contests—centered on the promotion of child rights.

In the national level, the Child Rights Network (CRN) gathered the children advocates—both CRN members and nonmembers—to celebrate the children’s month at the House of Representatives, held on October 21–23, 2013. Nine members of GNIP’s Child Rights Council (CRC) under the Southville CDP represented the organization in the poster-making contest and the children’s dialogue with the legislators—two of the highlights of the celebration—which happened in the first two days of the weeklong celebration. The CRC members placed first and third in the poster-making contest, with their artworks reflecting the celebration’s theme: “Pursue Inclusive Governance—Protect Children’s Rights Today and Tomorrow.” In the dialogue with the legislators, the children representing different organizations raised their concerns on issues about corporal punishment, child labor, malnutrition, and early pregnancy. (end)

3. Global Child Rights Day Celebration

_MG_9033_MG_8902Good Neighbors International Philippines (GNIP) has been celebrating the International Day of Children’s Rights since 2009 as a response to a 1954 resolution of the United Nations General Assembly that recommends every country to initiate a Universal Children’s Day as a day to focus on children’s well-being.

The celebration of child rights day last year aimed to create a deeper impact on society by not only driving a campaign that would create awareness about the rights of children but also by involving communities, schools, the government, and various civil society organizations in the promotion of the rights of the child while strengthening the said stakeholders as they partake in GNIP’s advocacy. The theme for last year’s celebration still revolved around the brand I LIKE (I Live, Inform, Educate: Karapatan para sa Kabataan), which GNIP has been carrying for three years now.

“The impact that the campaign has created… has become greater not only in terms of audience and area of coverage but also in terms of strategies directed toward building up advocates”

The I LIKE celebration also became an avenue to gather support for the survivors of supertyphoon Yolanda (international name Haiyan), which hit the country a few weeks before the day of the event. The Yolanda tragedy in turn served as a reminder that in times of disasters, one of the most vulnerable populations is the children. This is where the rights of children to protection and survival come in.

Looking at GNIP’s child rights campaign timeline, the impact that the campaign has created since it was first carried out in 2009 has become greater not only in terms of audience and area of coverage but also in terms of strategies directed toward building up advocates who can live out the organization’s vision for children. (end)